Self-reported health issues in recently arrived migrants to Sweden

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Self-reported health issues in recently arrived migrants to Sweden

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dc.contributor.author Zdravkovic, Slobodan
dc.contributor.author Grahn, Mathias
dc.contributor.author Björngren Cuadra, Carin
dc.date.accessioned 2016-12-19T09:47:34Z
dc.date.available 2016-12-19T09:47:34Z
dc.date.issued 2016 en_US
dc.identifier.issn 1101-1262
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2043/21775
dc.description.abstract Background The awareness of health and health related needs in migrants (i.e. refugees) is crucial for effective public support systems. For this and other reasons a regional survey was established to address various health issues in recently arrived migrants to Scania. The questions that the present study is seeking answers for relates health, changes in health as well as self-reported possibility to affect health in general but also in relation to level of education. Methods Data collection occurred between February 13, 2015 and February 12, 2016. The inclusion criteria were recently arrived adult migrants speaking Arabic, Dari, Pashto or Somali participating in the public support system. Questions on selfreported health, self-reported changes in health since the move to Sweden, self-reported possibility to affect own health as well as education was examined among others in an extensive health survey. The survey was funded by the European refugee fund. Results 681 respondents took part in the survey where 94% were Arabic speaking. 69% were men and 51% were 18 to 34 years. 23% graded self-reported health as very well and 46% as well. Highly educated reported very well to a higher degree (30%) than the primary (17%) and the secondary level (12%) (pvalue< 0.01). Change in health was reported by 32% as negative and by 21% as positive. No significant difference was observed in relation to education. 70% reported the possibility of affecting own health as very important and the comparison with education was significant (p-value<0.01). Over 64%, independently of education, reported own contribution as very important. Conclusions The majority of recently arrived migrants’ reports good health and own contribution for health as very important. Negative change in health was reported by almost a third of the migrants. (a) Increase efforts to stop negative changes in health. (b) Enhance health information practice to increase the benefits of own contribution for health. Key messages: - Recently arrived migrants reports a similar level of good health as the inhabitants of Scania observed in the latest regional public health survey - A third of the respondents reports worsening health since the move to Sweden en_US
dc.format.extent 1
dc.language.iso eng en_US
dc.publisher Oxford University Press en_US
dc.subject.classification Medicine en_US
dc.title Self-reported health issues in recently arrived migrants to Sweden en_US
dc.type Conference other en_US
dc.relation.url https://ephconference.eu/conference-vienna-2016-301 en_US
dc.identifier.paperprint 0 en_US
dc.contributor.department Malmö University. Faculty of Health and Society en_US
dc.contributor.department Malmö University. Care Science (VV) en_US
dc.identifier.doi 10.1093/eurpub/ckw170.035
dc.subject.srsc Research Subject Categories::MEDICINE en_US
dc.identifier.url http://eurpub.oxfordjournals.org/content/26/suppl_1/ckw170.035 en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpublication The European Journal of Public Health;suppl 1
dc.relation.ispartofpublicationvolume 26 en_US
dc.contributor.centre Malmö University. Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM) en_US
dcterms.description.conferenceName 9th European Public Health Conference en_US
dcterms.description.conferencePlace Vienna, Austria en_US
dcterms.description.conferenceYear 9 - 12 November 2016 en_US
dc.format.ePage 220
dc.format.sPage 220
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