Effects of Physical Activity and Motor Skills Acquisition on Executive Functions and Scholastic Performance : A Review

DSpace Repository

Effects of Physical Activity and Motor Skills Acquisition on Executive Functions and Scholastic Performance : A Review

Details

Files for download

Find Full text There are no files associated with this item..

Overview of item record
Publication Article, review other scientific
Title Effects of Physical Activity and Motor Skills Acquisition on Executive Functions and Scholastic Performance : A Review
Author Ericsson, Ingegerd
Date 2017
English abstract
The aim of this review was to present some of the current knowledge regarding effects of physical activity and motor skills practice on cognitive function and scholastic performance in children and youth. Current recommendations for physical activity in children focus on the quantitative aspects of physical activity and selected health-related components of physical fitness. The importance of motor skill acquisition early in life is often overlooked, which may limit qualitative aspects of interventions, such as motor skill development, socialization and enjoyment of exercise (Myer, Faigenbaum, Edwards, Clark, Best and Sallis, 2015). Searching for reviews and meta-analyses was done in ERIC via Ebsco, Google Scholar, MEDLINE, PUBMED, PsycINFO, SPORTDiscus, Summons, and Research Gate. The main findings show that cognition is grounded in perceptual-motor experiences within social and cultural contexts. Executive functions (inhibitory control, working memory, and cognitive flexibility) are sometimes more predictive of academic achievements than even IQ or socioeconomic status (Diamond and Ling, 2016). Perceptual-motor behaviors can, according to Lobo, Harbourne, and Dusing (2013) facilitate future development and readiness to learn in school. Larger gains in aerobic fitness can however be predictive of lesser improvements in cognitive performance (Etnier, Nowell, Landers and Sibley, 2006). Conclusions and potential recommendations for children and youth are discussed regarding motor skills and learning/cognitive function, including: Motor skill screening provides a valuable tool for identifying children in need of adapted support in motor skill development. Motor skill observations are recommended at school start to increase the predictability of later achievement. Specific ‘adapted’ interventions should be offered to children with motor skill deficits in order to benefit motor development and motivation for participation in physical activities. The MUGI model could be used for motor skills screening as well as motor skills training.
Link https://www.novapublishers.com/catalog/product_inf... (external link to publication)
Publisher Nova Science Publishers
Host/Issue Progress in Education;
Volume 43
ISSN 1535-4806
ISBN 978-1-53610-561-2
Pages 71-104
Language eng (iso)
Subject MUGI motor checklist
working memory
motor skills training
coordination
Physical education
Humanities/Social Sciences
Research Subject Categories::SOCIAL SCIENCES
Handle http://hdl.handle.net/2043/24046 Permalink to this page
Facebook

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Details

Search


Browse

My Account

Statistics