Carrying the ball? A critical discourse analysis of the Commonwealth Secretariat’s sport for development and peace agenda

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Carrying the ball? A critical discourse analysis of the Commonwealth Secretariat’s sport for development and peace agenda

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Publication 1-year master student thesis
Title Carrying the ball? A critical discourse analysis of the Commonwealth Secretariat’s sport for development and peace agenda
Author Raptis, Emanuel
Date 2018
English abstract
While the perceived sudden closure of the United Nations Office of Sport for Development and Peace (UNOSDP) in May 2017 has left many sport for development (SDP) scholars and practitioners pondering its future, the playing field is on the offensive to gain ground and fill the gaps caused by its withdrawal. With SDP being one of the core pillars within its sustainable development work, the Commonwealth Secretariat (CWS) has picked up the pace in producing and publishing a series of five high-level policy and advocacy resources in the period 2013-2017 with the aim of assisting governments and other stakeholders in strengthening their SDP policies and strategies. Departing from the perspective of a postcolonial and decolonization theoretical framework, this study has conducted a qualitative critical discourse analysis (CDA) with the purpose of identifying what discourses the CWS advances through the publication and dissemination of the five SDP policy and strategy documents, how the discourses draw from previous documents and texts, and how the discourses relate to mainstream SDP discourses. The findings suggests that the Commonwealth does not stand for change in the field of SDP, but largely perpetuates dominant SDP discourses related to i) why sport is uniquely positioned to strengthen development approaches; ii) in what areas of development SDP policies and strategies should be focused; and iii) whom such SDP initiatives should target. The study concludes with an argument that rather than carrying the ball in the current direction, the CWS could re-position itself as a leader in the field by adopting a postcolonial perspective going forward, thus passing the ball and changing the playing field altogether.
Publisher Malmö universitet/Kultur och samhälle
Language eng (iso)
Handle http://hdl.handle.net/2043/25393 Permalink to this page
Link to publication in DiVA Find this research publication in DiVA.
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