The impact of premature birth on dental maturation in the permanent dentition.

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The impact of premature birth on dental maturation in the permanent dentition.

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Publication Article, peer reviewed scientific
Title The impact of premature birth on dental maturation in the permanent dentition.
Author Paulsson, Liselotte ; Arvini, Sara ; Bergstrom, Niclas ; Klingberg, Gunilla ; Lindh, Christina
Date 2019
English abstract
OBJECTIVES: To evaluate tooth development and calculate dental maturity score in prematurely born children and to compare the findings with full-term born children. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Nine-year-old preterm children were selected from the Swedish Medical Birth Register. One group consisted of 36 extremely preterm children (born before week 29), and the other included 38 very preterm children (born during weeks 29 to 32). Panoramic radiography was performed on each child and the preterm children were compared with 42 full-term born children. Five observers independently assessed the tooth development stages for all teeth in the left mandible (31-37) on the panoramic radiographs according to the method described by Demirjian et al. (Hum Biol 45:211-227, 1973). Data from tooth development stages were compiled and converted into a dental maturity score for each group. Kappa values were calculated for intra- and inter-observer agreement. RESULTS: When the different development stages for each individual tooth were compared, all observers presented a significant delay in the maturity of tooth 37 for the extremely preterm group (p </= 0.002). The extremely preterm group had a significantly lower dental maturity score than the full-term group, as assessed by each observer (p </= 0.006). Kappa values for inter-observer agreement varied between 0.31 and 0.71 depending on tooth and intra-observer agreement was between 0.16 and 1.0. CONCLUSIONS: At age 9, the extremely preterm children had a general delay in tooth development. CLINICAL RELEVANCE: The increased survival rate of extremely preterm babies adds a new group of children to society. Dental clinicians should be aware that the delay in tooth development could impact the timing of orthodontic diagnostics and potential treatment.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/s00784-018-2501-3 (link to publisher's fulltext.)
Link https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs00784-018-2501-3 .Icon
Publisher Springer
Host/Issue Clinical Oral Investigations;2
Volume 23
ISSN 1432-6981
Language eng (iso)
Subject Dental maturation
Panoramic
Preterm birth
Radiography
Term birth
Tooth development
Medicine
Research Subject Categories::ODONTOLOGY
Handle http://hdl.handle.net/2043/26708 Permalink to this page
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