Explaining the Male Native-Immigrant Employment Gap in Sweden : The Role of Human Capital and Migrant Categories

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Explaining the Male Native-Immigrant Employment Gap in Sweden : The Role of Human Capital and Migrant Categories

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Publication Article, peer reviewed scientific
Title Explaining the Male Native-Immigrant Employment Gap in Sweden : The Role of Human Capital and Migrant Categories
Author Luik, Marc André ; Emilsson, Henrik ; Bevelander, Pieter
Research Centre Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM)
Date 2018
English abstract
Despite having a celebrated labor market integration policy, the immigrant–native employment gap in Sweden is one of the largest in the OECD. From a cross-country perspective, a key explanation might be migrant admission group composition. In this study we use high-quality detailed Swedish register data to estimate male employment gaps between non-EU/EES labour, family reunification and humanitarian migrants and natives. Moreover, we test if differences in human capital are able to explain rising employment integration heterogeneity. Our results indicate that employment integration is highly correlated with admission category. Interestingly, differences in human capital, demographic and contextual factors seem to explain only a small share of this correlation. Evidence from auxiliary regressions suggests that low transferability of human capital among humanitarian and family migrants might be part of the story. The article highlights the need to understand and account for migrant admission categories when studying employment integration.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/s12546-018-9206-y (link to publisher's fulltext.)
Publisher Springer
Host/Issue Journal of Population Research;4
Volume 35
ISSN 1835-9469
Page 363-398
Language eng (iso)
Subject Humanities/Social Sciences
Research Subject Categories::SOCIAL SCIENCES
Handle http://hdl.handle.net/2043/26862 Permalink to this page
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