Integrating an ex-vivo skin biointerface with electrochemical DNA biosensor for direct measurement of the protective effect of UV blocking agents

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Integrating an ex-vivo skin biointerface with electrochemical DNA biosensor for direct measurement of the protective effect of UV blocking agents

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Publication Article, peer reviewed scientific
Title Integrating an ex-vivo skin biointerface with electrochemical DNA biosensor for direct measurement of the protective effect of UV blocking agents
Author Mousavisani, Seyedeh Zeinab ; Raoof, Jahan-Bakhsh ; Cheung, Kwan Yee ; Camargo, Aura Rocío Hernández ; Ruzgas, Tautgirdas ; Turner, Anthony P F ; Mak, Wing Cheung
Research Centre Biofilms - Research Center for Biointerfaces
Date 2019
English abstract
Skin cancer is the most frequent kind of cancer in white people in many parts of the world. UV-induced DNA damage and genetic mutation can subsequently lead to skin cancer. Therefore development of new biosensing strategies for detection of UV-induced DNA damage is of great importance. Here we demonstrate a novel combination of an ex-vivo skin biointerface and an electrochemical DNA sensor for the direct detection of UV induced DNA damage and investigation the protective effect of various UV blockers (Zinc-oxide (ZnO), titanium-dioxide (TiO) nanoparticles (NPs) and sunscreens) against DNA damage. A diazonium modified screen-printed carbon electrode immobilized with a DNA sequence related to the p53 tumour suppressor gene, the most commonly affected gene in human UV-induced skin cancer, was applied as an electrochemical DNA sensor. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was employed for the detection of DNA damage induced by UV-A radiation by following the changes in charge transfer resistance (R). The protective effects of UV blockers applied onto a pig skin surface (a suitable model representing human skin) were successfully detected by the DNA sensor. We observed that the naked skin has little UV protection showing an 18.2% decreases in ∆R/R values compared to the control, while applying both NPs and NP-formulated sunscreens could significantly reduce DNA damage, resulting in a decrease in ∆R/R values of 67.1% (ZnO NPs), 77.2% (TiO NPs), 77.1% (sunscreen 1) and 92.4% (sunscreen 2), respectively. Moreover, doping moisturising cream with NPs could provide a similar DNA protective effect. This new method is a biologically relevant alternative to animal testing and offers advantages such as fast, easy and inexpensive processing, in addition to its miniaturised dimension, and could be used for a range of applications in other sources of DNA damage and the protective effect of different UV blocking agents and other topical formulations.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bios.2018.12.025 (link to publisher's fulltext.)
Publisher Elsevier
Host/Issue Biosensors and Bioelectronics;
Volume 128
ISSN 1873-4235
Language eng (iso)
Subject DNA damage
Electrochemical DNA biosensor
Nanoparticles
Skin biointerface
Sunscreens
Medicine
Research Subject Categories::NATURAL SCIENCES
Note Biosens Bioelectron
Handle http://hdl.handle.net/2043/27970 Permalink to this page
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