Non-prescribed use of methadone and buprenorphine prior to opioid substitution treatment : lifetime prevalence, motives, and drug sources among people with opioid dependence in five Swedish cities

DSpace Repository

Non-prescribed use of methadone and buprenorphine prior to opioid substitution treatment : lifetime prevalence, motives, and drug sources among people with opioid dependence in five Swedish cities

Details

Files for download
Icon
Overview of item record
Publication Article, peer reviewed scientific
Title Non-prescribed use of methadone and buprenorphine prior to opioid substitution treatment : lifetime prevalence, motives, and drug sources among people with opioid dependence in five Swedish cities
Author Johnson, Björn ; Richert, Torkel
Research Centre People, Places and Prevention: Addressing Criminality from an Integrated Perspective
Date 2019
English abstract
Background: Opioid substitution treatment (OST) with methadone or buprenorphine is the most effective means of treating opioid dependence. If these substances are used by people who are not undergoing OST, they can however carry serious risks. This article examines the lifetime prevalence, motives, and drug sources for such use, as well as geographical differences in these variables. Methods: Structured interviews were conducted with 411 patients from 11 OST clinics in five Swedish cities. The researchers carried out 280 interviews on-site, while 131 interviews were conducted by specially trained patients through privileged access interviewing. Data were analyzed by frequency and average calculations, cross-tabulations, and χ2 tests. Results: The lifetime prevalence of non-prescribed use was 87.8% for methadone, 80.5% for buprenorphine, and 50.6% for buprenorphine/naloxone. Pseudo-therapeutic motives—avoiding withdrawal symptoms, staying clean from heroin, detoxification, or taking care of one’s own OST—were commonly cited as driving the use, while using the drugs for euphoric purposes was a less common motive. Most respondents had bought or received the substances from patients in OST, but dealers were also a significant source of non-prescribed methadone and buprenorphine. Geographical differences of use, motives, and sources suggest that prescription practices in OST have a great impact on which substances are used outside of the treatment. Conclusions: Experiences of non-prescribed use of methadone and buprenorphine are extremely common among those in OST in southern Sweden. As the use is typically driven by pseudo-therapeutic motives, increased access to OST might decrease the illicit demand for these substances. Buprenorphine/naloxone has a lower abuse potential than buprenorphine and should therefore be prioritized as the prescribed drug. Supervised dosage and other control measures are important provisions in the prevention of drug diversion and non-prescribed use among people not undergoing OST.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1186/s12954-019-0301-y (link to publisher's fulltext.)
Link https://harmreductionjournal.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12954-019-0301-y .Icon
Publisher BioMed Central
Host/Issue Harm Reduction Journal;31
Volume 16
ISSN 1477-7517
Language eng (iso)
Subject Opioid substitution treatment
Methadone
Buprenorphine
Buprenorphine/naloxone
Non-prescribed use
Pseudo-therapeutic use
Diversion
Opioid dependence
Humanities/Social Sciences
Research Subject Categories::SOCIAL SCIENCES
Handle http://hdl.handle.net/2043/28535 Permalink to this page
Facebook

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Details

Search


Browse

My Account

Statistics