SUSPECT COMMUNITY POLICING PRACTICES IN UGANDA: THE CASE OF WAKISO DISTRICT IN UGANDA

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SUSPECT COMMUNITY POLICING PRACTICES IN UGANDA: THE CASE OF WAKISO DISTRICT IN UGANDA

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Publication 2-year master student thesis
Title SUSPECT COMMUNITY POLICING PRACTICES IN UGANDA: THE CASE OF WAKISO DISTRICT IN UGANDA
Author Sempagala, Alex
Date 2019
English abstract
ABSTRACT Police departments across Uganda are faced with significant challenges to reduce crime, improve quality of life, and, use meagre resources. Many have struggled to find the right balance between keeping communities safe, while at the same time having transparent and effective policing methods and approach. This thesis examines effectiveness or/ and ineffectiveness of community policing. This is derived from people’s perceptions of the policing strategies used within their communities. The research focuses on the nature of community policing and its, perception among the Ugandans and how these policing strategies are important to police legitimacy (acceptability) and how it helps them in gaining the trust of the local population. The thesis discusses reasons to why community policing has not been accepted by the Uganda population. Continually therefore, it is examined whether community policing has brought about reduction in crime rate. The thesis revealed that there is much laxity in bridging the gap between the community members and the police. Most people feel police is not involving the entire community into their activities, people think police is to protect certain groups of people in society especially the rich. Most people (47%) negatively perceive community policing, though 56% reported that it is an important program. Reduction in crime due to community policing was observed. The thesis concludes by advocating for strategies that are important for a successful community policing program implementation. Finally, the thesis recommended involvement of the media and need for police to adapt to use of new technology to avoid confrontation by masses that may be suspicious, for example, body-worn cameras (BWCs).
Publisher Malmö universitet/Hälsa och samhälle
Language eng (iso)
Subject Community Policing; community; and police
Handle http://hdl.handle.net/2043/28721 Permalink to this page
Link to publication in DiVA Find this research publication in DiVA (n/a for student publ.)
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