Being an Asylum Seeker in Bosnia and Herzegovina; Migration Experiences and Reasons for Seeking Asylum in a non-EU Country

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Being an Asylum Seeker in Bosnia and Herzegovina; Migration Experiences and Reasons for Seeking Asylum in a non-EU Country

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Publication 1-year master student thesis
Title Being an Asylum Seeker in Bosnia and Herzegovina; Migration Experiences and Reasons for Seeking Asylum in a non-EU Country
Author Hindic, Sara
Date 2019
English abstract
The overall purpose of this thesis is to draw attention to the growing number of asylum seekers who chose to come to Bosnia and Herzegovina as a non-EU country, and increase the knowledge and understanding of the numerous political and social factors that influenced that decision. In order to achieve the purpose of this narrative research, a qualitative method was used, based on semi-structured interviews with six asylum seekers. The reasons for leaving the country of origin, the problems they encountered during the journey, and the reasons and motivation for seeking asylum in Bosnia and Herzegovina were explored. The data analysis relied on the Push and Pull theory, as well as on the Social Network and Social Capital theory, for help in better understanding the asylum seekers trajectory. Data obtained through interviews reflected a number of factors affecting the migration of asylum seekers: lack of security, violence, threats, political reasons, external or internal wars, lack of jobs and economic insecurity. An important role in the decision process of asylum seekers was played by the Social Network and Social Capital, including inevitable smugglers as facilitators and sources of information on potential destination countries. The asylum seekers’ journey was not straightforward; instead it was actually a multi-step process. On their way to BiH, they stopped in the countries they transited and spent a considerable period of time there. The growing importance of transit countries is reflected in the fact that they have become nodes where asylum seekers can receive and evaluate new information, reconsider their decisions, or make new ones.
Publisher Malmö universitet/Kultur och samhälle
Language eng (iso)
Handle http://hdl.handle.net/2043/29980 Permalink to this page
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