Affective bodying of mathematics, children and difference : choreographing 'sad affects' as affirmative politics in early mathematics teacher education

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Affective bodying of mathematics, children and difference : choreographing 'sad affects' as affirmative politics in early mathematics teacher education

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Publication Article, peer reviewed scientific
Title Affective bodying of mathematics, children and difference : choreographing 'sad affects' as affirmative politics in early mathematics teacher education
Author Chronaki, Anna
Date 2019
English abstract
This paper responds to the frequently occurring phenomena of 'sad affects' experienced by student teachers as they confront the logic of 'proper mathematics' with young children of differently abled bodies. The notion of 'proper' entails a normalizing fixity of 'what counts' as mathematics for certain children and fails to recognize mathematics as a sensual encounter amongst bodies. The study draws upon Spinoza's notion of affect to consider the body's capacity to act, and makes the case for choreographing with body-movement, rather than disclosing, the politics involved in becoming teachers. It discusses how affective bodying with mathematics, children and difference in the classroom practice can be not only deconstructed but also reconstructed in affirmative terms, choreographically, as feeling and thinking-in-movement in ways that trouble and perturb the prevailing sharing of the 'sensible' in early childhood mathematics and in teacher education.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/s11858-019-01045-9 (link to publisher's fulltext.)
Link https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11858-019-01045-9 .Icon
Publisher Springer
Host/Issue Zdm: Mathematics Education;2
Volume 51
ISSN 1863-9690
Language eng (iso)
Subject Early childhood mathematics
Teacher education
Affect
Sad affects
Body
Bodying
Feeling and thinking
Choreographing
Movement
Aesthetico-political pedagogy
Affirmative politics
Humanities/Social Sciences
Research Subject Categories::SOCIAL SCIENCES
Handle http://hdl.handle.net/2043/30042 Permalink to this page
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