Acceptance: a factor to consider in persistent pain after neck trauma.

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Acceptance: a factor to consider in persistent pain after neck trauma.

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Publication Article, peer reviewed scientific
Title Acceptance: a factor to consider in persistent pain after neck trauma.
Author Åkerblom, Sophia ; Larsson, Johan ; Malmström, Eva-Maj ; Persson, Elisabeth ; Westergren, Hans
Date 2019
English abstract
Background and aims Studies on the interaction between acceptance and pain-related processes after neck trauma are to our knowledge sparse and such treatment strategies are rarely incorporated in management and treatment of posttraumatic neck pain. Thus, the aim of the present study is to investigate how acceptance relates to persistent pain in patients after neck trauma, when controlling for the influence of other psychological factors, trauma characteristics and demographic variables. Methods Consecutive patients with persistent pain and disability after neck trauma (n = 565) were assessed by a multi-professional team at a specialized pain rehabilitation clinic. Separate regression analyses were conducted with three outcomes: pain distribution, pain interference, and pain severity. Predictors were age, sex, education, time since trauma, type of trauma, anxiety, depression, and acceptance. Results Acceptance was the only factor associated with all outcomes, and patients with lower acceptance displayed more widespread pain and greater interference and severity of pain. The results also showed that higher depression was associated with worse pain interference and severity, whilst anxiety only mattered significantly for pain severity and not for pain interference. Female sex was related to more widespread pain and greater pain interference. Conclusions Overall acceptance stood out as the most important factor for the different outcomes and lower acceptance was associated with more widespread pain distribution and greater pain interference and severity. Implications The findings of this study add to a growing body of literature confirming that the development of chronicity after neck trauma should be understood as a multidimensional process, best described by a biopsychosocial model. The results also suggest that psychological factors and especially acceptance might be important processes with implications for enhanced recovery after neck trauma.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1515/sjpain-2019-0021 (link to publisher's fulltext.)
Publisher De Gruyter
Host/Issue Scandinavian Journal of Pain;4
Volume 19
ISSN 1877-8860
Language eng (iso)
Subject whiplash injuries
neck pain
anxiety
depression
acceptance
chronic pain
Medicine
Research Subject Categories::ODONTOLOGY
Handle http://hdl.handle.net/2043/30192 Permalink to this page
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