Targeting the escalation of cybercrime in Greece. A systematic literature review.

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Targeting the escalation of cybercrime in Greece. A systematic literature review.

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Publication 2-year master student thesis
Title Targeting the escalation of cybercrime in Greece. A systematic literature review.
Author Katerina Rebecca, Paraskeva
Date 2019
English abstract
Abstract: Cybercrime refers to any illegal use of technology, a computer, networked device or a network for criminal acts. It constitutes a rapidly evolving and complex phenomenon as the Internet is ruling on almost every sector of human activity. Innovation plays a highly significant role in the growth of an economy. However, every time there is an advancement in the field of technology, there is bound to be other adverse effects. Such is the case with criminology. In this end, the prevalence of cybercrime is alarmingly increasing, and there have been several attempts by the government and other concerned agencies at stemming its escalation (Curtis et al., 2009). The following thesis shows the investigation of the rise of cybercrime in Greece. It is a systematic literature review available on this topic, aiming to explore areas such as the preparedness of the government in the fight against cybercrime, and the consideration that, in so doing, it is obligated to protect the rights of intellectual property as well as the protection of the rights to privacy of its citizens (Gobran, 2015). Of all the categories of information technology-related crimes, cybercrimes are the most common. The thesis also explores the conventions and laws employed by law enforcement in the efforts to counter the activities of cybercrime, including their effectiveness. It also establishes the different sectors and industries with the highest rates of cybercrime activities and the ways in which these sectors are fighting against these activities.
Publisher Malmö universitet/Hälsa och samhälle
Language eng (iso)
Subject criminology, cybercrime, escalation, systematic literature review
Handle http://hdl.handle.net/2043/30253 Permalink to this page
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