AGE-SPECIFIC RISK FACTORS FOR RADICALIZATION - MOVING BEYOND IDEOLOGY

DSpace Repository

AGE-SPECIFIC RISK FACTORS FOR RADICALIZATION - MOVING BEYOND IDEOLOGY

Details

Files for download
Icon
Overview of item record
Publication 2-year master student thesis
Title AGE-SPECIFIC RISK FACTORS FOR RADICALIZATION - MOVING BEYOND IDEOLOGY
Author Blomberg, Jesper
Date 2020
English abstract
Introduction. This study examines the age-specific risk factors associated with radicalization that could contribute to Swedish research and responsible investigative authorities. Specific knowledge of individual risk factors for radicalization is remarkably limited, especially compared to what we know about other forms of violence. Methods. A total of 1240 cases are included after a data cleaning of the PIRUS- dataset. An exploratory factor analysis examined youths (<21), adults (>22), and a no age-specific group. Results. The younger population tends to have more often been abused as a child, had some traumatic experience, and are currently part of a gang. In comparison, the older population tend to have alcohol or drug abuse problems and more unstructured time, have a radicalized friend and have actively searched for their radicalized group. The All-group shares a variety of variables with the age-specific groups. Conclusion. The results imply a need for specified risk factors according to age. The age-specific analysis provides a deepened understanding of age-specific risk factors that contribute to radicalization and make individuals susceptible to radicalized groups. Since different authorities are responsible for minors and adults and already work with a risk factor approach, the findings in this essay imply that the authorities should investigate their current policies and update them to age-specific risk factors if necessary.
Publisher Malmö universitet/Hälsa och samhälle
Language eng (iso)
Subject Age-specific
PIRUS
Psychological Vulnerabilities
Radicalization
Risk Factors
Sweden
Violent Extremism
Handle http://hdl.handle.net/2043/32271 Permalink to this page
Link to publication in DiVA Find this research publication in DiVA (n/a for student publ.)
Facebook

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Details

Search


Browse

My Account

Statistics