Abundances of disk and bulge giants from high-resolution optical spectra : I. O, Mg, Ca, and Ti in the solar neighborhood and Kepler field samples

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Abundances of disk and bulge giants from high-resolution optical spectra : I. O, Mg, Ca, and Ti in the solar neighborhood and Kepler field samples

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Publication Article, peer reviewed scientific
Title Abundances of disk and bulge giants from high-resolution optical spectra : I. O, Mg, Ca, and Ti in the solar neighborhood and Kepler field samples
Author Jönsson, Henrik ; Ryde, Nils ; Nordlander, T ; Pehlivan Rhodin, Asli ; Hartman, Henrik ; Jönsson, Per ; Eriksson, Kjell
Date 2017
English abstract
Context. The Galactic bulge is an intriguing and significant part of our Galaxy, but it is hard to observe because it is both distant and covered by dust in the disk. Therefore, there are not many high-resolution optical spectra of bulge stars with large wavelength coverage, whose determined abundances can be compared with nearby, similarly analyzed stellar samples. Aims. We aim to determine the diagnostically important alpha elements of a sample of bulge giants using high-resolution optical spectra with large wavelength coverage. The abundances found are compared to similarly derived abundances from similar spectra of similar stars in the local thin and thick disks. In this first paper we focus on the solar neighborhood reference sample. Methods. We used spectral synthesis to derive the stellar parameters as well as the elemental abundances of both the local and bulge samples of giants. We took special care to benchmark our method of determining stellar parameters against independent measurements of effective temperatures from angular diameter measurements and surface gravities from asteroseismology. Results. In this first paper we present the method used to determine the stellar parameters and elemental abundances, evaluate them, and present the results for our local disk sample of 291 giants. Conclusions. When comparing our determined spectroscopic temperatures to those derived from angular diameter measurements, we reproduce these with a systematic difference of +10 K and a standard deviation of 53 K. The spectroscopic gravities reproduce those determined from asteroseismology with a systematic offset of +0.10 dex and a standard deviation of 0.12 dex. When it comes to the abundance trends, our sample of local disk giants closely follows trends found in other works analyzing solar neighborhood dwarfs, showing that the much brighter giant stars are as good abundance probes as the often used dwarfs.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1051/0004-6361/201629128 (link to publisher's fulltext.)
Publisher EDP Sciences
Host/Issue Astronomy and Astrophysics;
Volume 598
ISSN 0004-6361
Pages 11
Language eng (iso)
Subject atomic astrophysics
Humanities/Social Sciences
Research Subject Categories::NATURAL SCIENCES
Handle http://hdl.handle.net/2043/22045 Permalink to this page
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