It is not just about occupation, but also about where you work

DSpace Repository

It is not just about occupation, but also about where you work

Details

Files for download
Icon
Main article
Overview of item record
Publication Article, peer reviewed scientific
Title It is not just about occupation, but also about where you work
Author Berthelsen, Hanne ; Westerlund, Hugo ; Hakanen, Jari J ; Kristensen, Tage S
Research Centre Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA)
Date 2017
English abstract
Objectives: Dentistry is characterized by a meaningful but also stressful psychosocial working environment. Job satisfaction varies among staff working under different organizational forms. The aim of this study was to identify (i) to what extent crucial psychosocial work environment characteristics differ among occupations in general public dental clinics in Sweden, and (ii) how much of the variation within each occupation is attributable to the organizational level. Methods: All staff (N=1782) employed in four public dental organizations received an email with personal log-in to an electronic questionnaire based on the Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire. After two reminders, a response rate of 75% was obtained. Responses from 880 nonmanagerial dentists, dental hygienists and dental nurses working in general practices were included in our analyses. Results: First, we compared the three dental occupations. We found that job demands, task resources (eg influence, possibilities for development and role clarity), strain symptoms and attitudes to work differed among occupations, dentists having the least favourable situation. Next, we compared the four organizations for each occupational group, separately. For dentists, a significant and relevant amount of variance (P<.05 and ICC >.05) was explained by the organizational level for 15 of 26 subscales, least pronounced for task resources. By contrast, for dental nurses and hygienists, the corresponding number was 2 subscales of 26. The psychosocial working environment of people working at the organization with the highest levels of strain indicators and the least positive work-related attitudes differed systematically from the organization with the most favourable profile, in particular regarding job demands and leadership aspects. Conclusion: In conclusion, the psychosocial working environment depended to a large degree on occupation and, for dentists in particular, also on their organizational affiliation. The findings suggest a potential for designing interventions at organizational level for improvements of the psychosocial working environment for dentists.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1111/cdoe.12300 (link to publisher's fulltext.)
Link http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/cdoe.12300/full .Icon
Publisher Wiley
Host/Issue Community Dentistry and Oral Epidemiology;4
Volume 45
ISSN 1600-0528
Pages 372-379
Language eng (iso)
Subject COPSOQ
dental services research
public health
psychosocial working environment
health services
manpower
Humanities/Social Sciences
Research Subject Categories::INTERDISCIPLINARY RESEARCH AREAS
Handle http://hdl.handle.net/2043/22682 Permalink to this page
Facebook

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Details

Search


Browse

My Account

Statistics