Does Surgical Experience Influence Implant Survival Rate? A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

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Does Surgical Experience Influence Implant Survival Rate? A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

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Publication Article, review peer-reviewed scientific
Title Does Surgical Experience Influence Implant Survival Rate? A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
Author Sendyk, Daniel ; Chrcanovic, Bruno ; Albrektsson, Tomas ; Wennerberg, Ann ; Deboni, Maria Cristina
Research Centre Biofilms - Research Center for Biointerfaces
Date 2017
English abstract
Purpose: The aim of this study was to assess the evidence of a correlation between the expertise of surgeons and the survival rate of dental implants. Materials and Methods: An electronic search in four databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, SCOPUS, and the Cochrane Library) was performed for publications from their inception to May 2016 and was supplemented by manual searches. Prospective and retrospective cohorts were included if they met the following criteria: (1) the presence of an exposed group (inexperienced surgeons); and (2) the presence of a control group (experienced surgeons). Meta-analyses were performed to evaluate the effect of expertise on implant failure. Results: Of 609 potentially eligible articles, 8 were included in the qualitative analysis and 6 in the quantitative synthesis. Two meta-analyses were performed for different definitions of experienced surgeons. In the first meta-analysis, which included four retrospective comparative studies that defined experienced professionals as specialists, the experience of the surgeon did not significantly affect the implant failure rate (P = .54), with an odds ratio (OR) of 1.24 (95% CI, 0.62–2.48). In the second meta-analysis, which included two retrospective studies that defined experienced surgeons as professionals that had placed more than 50 implants, the expertise of the surgeon did significantly affect the implant failure rates (P = .0005), with an OR of 2.18 (95% CI, 1.40–3.39). Conclusion: The data from the included publications suggest that surgical experience did not significantly affect implant failure when considering experience based on specialty but were significantly affected when considering experience based on the number of implants placed. Further standardized prospective studies with a control of confounding factors are needed to clarify the role of surgical expertise on implant survival rates.
DOI https://doi.org/10.11607/ijp.5211 (link to publisher's fulltext.)
Link http://www.quintpub.com/journals/ijp/abstract.php?... (external link to publication)
Publisher Quintessence
Host/Issue International Journal of Prosthodontics;4
Volume 30
ISSN 0893-2174
Pages 341-347
Language eng (iso)
Subject Medicine
Research Subject Categories::ODONTOLOGY
Handle http://hdl.handle.net/2043/22995 Permalink to this page
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