Baseline data from a planned RCT on attitudes to female genital cutting after migration: when are interventions justified?

DSpace Repository

Baseline data from a planned RCT on attitudes to female genital cutting after migration: when are interventions justified?

Details

Files for download
Icon
Main article
Overview of item record
Publication Article, peer reviewed scientific
Title Baseline data from a planned RCT on attitudes to female genital cutting after migration: when are interventions justified?
Author Wahlberg, Anna ; Johnsdotter, Sara ; Ekholm Selling, Katarina ; Källestål, Carina ; Essén, Birgitta
Research Centre Centre for Sexology and Sexuality Studies
Date 2017
English abstract
Objectives: To present the primary outcomes from a baseline study on attitudes towards female genital cutting (FGC) after migration. Design: Baseline data from a planned cluster randomised, controlled trial. Face-to-face interviews were used to collect questionnaire data in 2015. Based on our hypothesis that established Somalis could be used as facilitators of change among those newly arrived, data were stratified into years of residency in Sweden. Setting: Sweden. Participants: 372 Somali men and women, 206 newly arrived (0–4 years), 166 established (>4 years). Primary outcome measures: Whether FGC is acceptable, preferred for daughter and should continue, specified on anatomical extent. Results: The support for anatomical change of girls and women’s genitals ranged from 0% to 2% among established and from 4% to 8% among newly arrived. Among those supporting no anatomical change, 75%–83% among established and 53%–67% among newly arrived opposed all forms of FGC, with the remaining supporting pricking of the skin with no removal of tissue. Among newly arrived, 37% stated that pricking was acceptable, 39% said they wanted their daughter to be pricked and 26% reported they wanted pricking to continue being practised. Those who had lived in Sweden ≤ 2 years had highest odds of supporting FGC; thereafter, the opposition towards FGC increased over time after migration. Conclusion: A majority of Somali immigrants, including those newly arrived, opposed all forms of FGC with increased opposition over time after migration. The majority of proponents of FGC supported pricking. We argue that it would have been unethical to proceed with the intervention as it, with this baseline, would have been difficult to detect a change in attitudes given that a majority opposed all forms of FGC together with the evidence that a strong attitude change is already happening. Therefore, we decided not to implement the planned intervention. Trial registration number NCT02335697; Pre-results.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2017-017506 (link to publisher's fulltext.)
Link http://bmjopen.bmj.com/content/7/8/e017506 .Icon
Publisher BMJ
Host/Issue BMJ Open;
Volume 7
ISSN 2044-6055
Language eng (iso)
Subject female genital mutilation
female circumcision
pricking
migration
diaspora
Somalia
Sweden
intervention
Humanities/Social Sciences
Research Subject Categories::MEDICINE
Handle http://hdl.handle.net/2043/23188 Permalink to this page
Facebook

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Details

Search


Browse

My Account

Statistics