Smartphone Apps Targeting Hazardous Drinking Patterns among University Students Show Differential Subgroup Effects over 20 Weeks : Results from a Randomized, Controlled Trial.

DSpace Repository

Smartphone Apps Targeting Hazardous Drinking Patterns among University Students Show Differential Subgroup Effects over 20 Weeks : Results from a Randomized, Controlled Trial.

Details

Files for download
Icon
Overview of item record
Publication Article, peer reviewed scientific
Title Smartphone Apps Targeting Hazardous Drinking Patterns among University Students Show Differential Subgroup Effects over 20 Weeks : Results from a Randomized, Controlled Trial.
Author Berman, Anne H ; Andersson, Claes ; Gajecki, Mikael ; Rosendahl, Ingvar ; Sinadinovic, Kristina ; Blankers, Matthijs
Date 2019
English abstract
Overconsumption of alcohol, from hazardous to excessive, heavy, and harmful levels, is common among university students. Consenting Swedish students were assigned to one of two smartphone apps offering feedback on estimated blood alcohol concentration (eBAC; Promillekoll/PartyPlanner) or assessment only (n = 2166; 1:1:1 ratio). App participants with excessive drinking according to public health criteria (>9/>14 drinks/week for women/men, respectively) at a 7 week follow-up were additionally assigned to the skills-based TeleCoach app or waitlist (n = 186; 1:1 ratio). All participants were followed at 14 and 20 weeks. At 7 weeks, Promillekoll users showed higher risk of excessive drinking (odds ratio (OR) = 1.83; p </= 0.01; n = 1558). Students in eBAC app groups with only hazardous use showed fewer binge drinking occasions at 14 weeks and lower eBAC levels up to 20 weeks compared to controls (n = 1157). Also, more highly motivated participants at baseline in both eBAC app groups drank less compared to controls at 7 and 20 weeks. Hidden Markov model analysis revealed a frequent-heavy drinking group (n = 146; 4.6 days/week, SD = 1.4), where those with access to TeleCoach had fewer drinking days compared to assessment-only controls (p < 0.001). eBAC apps showed positive effects up to 20 weeks, particularly for motivated students, and a skills-based app can reduce consumption for those with frequent-heavy drinking patterns.
DOI https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm8111807 (link to publisher's fulltext.)
Link https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm8111807 .Icon
Publisher MDPI
Host/Issue Journal of Clinical Medicine;11
Volume 8
ISSN 2077-0383
Language eng (iso)
Subject hazardous alcohol use
university students
smartphone apps
m-health
brief intervention
Medicine
Research Subject Categories::MEDICINE
Handle http://hdl.handle.net/2043/30641 Permalink to this page
Facebook

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Details

Search


Browse

My Account

Statistics