Centralization and Urbanization Tendencies in Norway

DSpace Repository

Centralization and Urbanization Tendencies in Norway

Details

Files for download

Find Full text There are no files associated with this item..

Overview of item record
Publication BookChapter
Title Centralization and Urbanization Tendencies in Norway
Author Andersson, Magnus ; Håkansson, Peter Gladoic ; Thorsen, Inge
Editor Håkansson, Peter Gladoic ; Bohman, Helena
Date 2019
English abstract
This chapter examines observed regional inequalities and centralization tendencies in Norway. Small, rural, municipalities experienced a favourable population development from 1970 to the mid-1980s. After this, the percentage population growth has been strongest in the largest municipalities/cities, and this tendency has accelerated during the last 10-15 years. Data post-1970 strongly support the reasonable hypothesis that population growth is positively related to centrality. The major source of changes lies within the labour market regions, whereas the changes between the regions are modest. Jobs have not become more centralized than households over the period. A conceptual model is developed, offering a useful taxonomy of municipalities in three dimensions: the unemployment rate, the employment growth, and housing prices. This provides a classification that contributes to clarify the changes in the urban-rural divide. The discussion demonstrates that distinguishing between different categories is important, since different explanations of centralization and regional disparities call for different menus of policy instruments. We study the relationship between population growth, unemployment rates, and employment growth in Norwegian municipalities, to distinguish between disequilibrium and equilibrium explanations of the situation in regional labour markets. At a national level our results indicate that neoclassical adjustments dominate weakly over amenity-based mechanisms. However, results from many regions support the hypothesis that amenitybased adjustments are dominant for municipalities within a labour market region. One possible explanation is that the diversity in job opportunities is considered as an amenity. A thicker labour market is better fit to meet the demand of workers with specific qualifications.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1108/978-1-78973-941-120191003 (link to publisher's fulltext.)
Publisher Emerald Publishing Limited
Host/Issue Investigating Spatial Inequalities : Mobility, Housing and Employment in Scandinavia and South-East Europe
ISBN 9781789739428
Language eng (iso)
Subject Centralization of jobs and households
regional inequalities
disequilibrium explanations
amenity-based adjustments
Humanities/Social Sciences
Research Subject Categories::SOCIAL SCIENCES
Handle http://hdl.handle.net/2043/30803 Permalink to this page
Buy print http://www.bokfynd.nu/...9781789739428 (Search for reseller)
Link to publication in DiVA Find this research publication in DiVA (n/a for student publ.)
Facebook

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Details

Search


Browse

My Account

Statistics